1451

1451

Oldest reference to the fountain, daerdmennekenpist (“the place where the child pees”), in an administrative text relating to the network of water pipes that fed Brussels’ public fountains.

1572

1572

First schematic illustration of Manneken-Pis at the corner of Rue de l’Étuve and Rue du Chêne in the map drawn by Georg Braun and Franz Hogenberg. The fountain is shown on the street.

1615

1615

First known depiction of Manneken-Pis wearing clothes, attired as a shepherd in Denis van Alsloot’s painting of the Ommegang parade. A preparatory sketch of this painting shows the statue perched atop a column, emptying its water into twin pools. © V&A

1619

1619

The Brussels Authorities order a new version of Manneken-Pis from Jérôme Duquesnoy for the fountain’s renovation; the column, basin, and sculpture are replaced.

1695

1695

Manneken-Pis is chosen as a spokesperson for the people of Brussels by the author of a satirical text criticizing the King of France, Louis XIV, who has just bombarded Brussels. This publication is the first to reflect the statue’s fame.

1710

1710

Early 18th century first detailed depiction of the fountain, now located further back from the street and protected behind a railing, in an engraving by Jacques Harrewijn. The fountain is in its current location.

1720

1720

Confirmation is given in a story of the tradition of dressing up Manneken-Pis during celebrations that are a basic facet of life in Brussels, and the practice of non-residents coming to visit the statue.

1747

1747

King Louis XIV of France makes Manneken-Pis a Knight of the Order of Saint-Louis and gives him nobleman's costume by way of an apology for the attempted theft of Manneken-Pis by some of his soldiers garrisoned in Brussels. This is the oldest of Manneken-Pis’ costumes to have been preserved.

1756

1756

First known appointment of an official tailor for Manneken-Pis.

1770

1770

The statue is placed in a new Rococo backdrop, previously used for another fountain. From this point on, the statue seems small and it is not possible to see its back.

1817

1817

Theft of Manneken-Pis. It is quickly found . The statue, broken into eleven pieces, is restored, and the guilty party is severely punished.

1824

1824

Publication by French author Jacques Collin de Plancy of a story about Manneken-Pis in which he recounts legends that explain the choice of the sculpture’s theme. Although the book is whimsical, it became the basis for a number of later books devoted to the statue.

1845

1845

Confusion arises on the part of historians Alexandre Henne and Alphonse Wauters between the Manneken-Pis and the Julianekensborre (“little Julien”) fountains. These two features were previously situated close to one another, which explains why Manneken-Pis is often still referred to as “Julien”.

1851

1851

Manneken-Pis becomes a purely decorative fountain. Its water now flows into a basin made inaccessible by the new railing.

1965

1965

Another theft. Manneken-Pis is broken in two. Its feet and ankles remain on the base, with the rest of the body gone. A copy of the sculpture is placed at the fountain, where it remains today.

1966

1966

Following an anonymous phone call, the part of the statue stolen the year before is fished out of the Brussels-Charleroi canal. Both pieces of the sculpture are kept at the museum.

1975

1975

The Manneken-Pis statue together with the fountain and the fence are classified as a historical monument by royal decree.

2003

2003

The statue is restored.